Umbrella Final Agreement

The peel watershed, rich in non-renewable natural resources, is part of the traditional territory of a number of Yukon First Nations. The Commission is a politically neutral body, created in 2004 with appointments from both Yukon and First Nations. Its mandate is to establish a land use plan for the region, in accordance with the final agreements with first nations in the region. The Commission was responsible for developing a project and a final recommended plan, with a mandatory procedure for consultation with First Nations. Yukon has the authority to approve, reject or amend the Commission`s recommendations. “Twenty-five years ago, Canada, Yukon and the Council of Yukon Indians (now the Council of Yukon First Nations) signed the Umbrella Final Agreement. This document presented the presentation of the 11 modern treaties that we have today in the Yukon and also provided for the negotiation of self-management agreements. The first four final and self-governing agreements were also signed in 1993 by the Champagne and Ashihik First Nations, Na-Cho Nyak Dun First Nation, the Teslin Tlingit Council and the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. Together Today for Our Children Tomorrow`s path to umbrella`s final agreement and the resulting treaties and self-management arrangements have been long and unexplored. While there have been many challenges on this path, the agreements embody the common path we have followed together, more equitable and inclusive for all. They put power back in the hands of 11 Yukon First Nations to govern their communities and gave all Yukoners a greater say in the management of the land by changing the way Yukon does business, with First Nations around the table of partners shaping policy across sectors and advancing economic development for the benefit of Yukon First Nations. Yukon.

All Yukoners and Canadians. In 1993, Canada, Yukon and the Council of Yukon Indians entered into a final Umbrella Agreement that served as a model for individualized final agreements that were then negotiated with Yukon First Nations. The Final Agreements recognize the traditional territories of the First Nation signatories and their right to participate in the management of public resources in that territory. Each final agreement took over the consultative and collaborative process for the development of regional land use plans in Yukon, which had been negotiated in the umbrella final agreement. . . .